Wilma Dykeman left a legacy of environmental awareness

Wilma Dykeman on her porch in Newport during the 1960's (the height of her career), with Mt. Guyot in the background (to the far right).

“Shaconage—Place of the Blue Smoke—the Cherokees called it, the long range of forested pinnacles and plunging valleys crowning the boundary between North Carolina and Tennessee. Eden was the description bestowed by early botanists on this virgin wilderness. But thickets of intertwined laurel and tough rhododendron were known to hunters and settlers as hells.”
Very few writers have captured the essence of the Great Smoky Mountains as accurately as these words written by Wilma Dykeman in her book Explorations, published in 1984.

Turtle Trot

“Guess what I just did,” my husband Tim asked as he bounded into the kitchen. As my Mamaw Jo would say: “He’s smilin’ from ear to ear.” It was obvious that he was happy about something.
But I went with what would make me happy: “You bought a large box of chocolates?” Hey, a girl can dream.

Salmon Loaf

Art work of salmon with a fishing rod.

A can of salmon on your pantry shelf is always a good beginning for a tasty meal. Drain salmon. Remove skin and bones. Flake salmon with a fork. Add softened cream cheese, lemon juice, onion, salt and liquid smoke. Stir well. chill mixture, covered, several hours or overnight. Then shape salmon mixture into a log. Combine pecans and parsley. Stir well. Roll salmon log in pecan mixture. Place on serving plate and chill for several hours. Makes a 10 inch log. Serve with assorted crackers.