Remembering Friends - Especially Pauline Rutherford Sharp and Gladys Stooksbury Snoderly

Remembering Friends - Especially Pauline Rutherford Sharp and Gladys Stooksbury Snoderly

My friend Pauline Sharp sent me a picture of Gladys Stooksbury Snoderly riding a jenny. The picture was made near the Dr. F. C. Bradfute home at old Loyston. Pauline fondly recalls opening a gate for Gladys so that she could go visit some of her relatives without having to get off and back on the jenny. Gladys was born July 28, 1908 at old Loyston, the daughter of John Franklin and Mary M. Stooksbury. Pauline thinks she was about nine or ten years old–1917 or 1918–when the picture was taken. Gladys grew up in Union County. She attended the old Loyston School and also participated in a music group. She lived at Loyston until the Norris Dam project forced the family to move. They relocated to Blount County, and Gladys lived the rest of her life at Maryville. Before leaving Union County and according to Union County school records, Gladys taught school at Pinnacle View, Central View and Snodderly Schools. Gladys married Ruben Lee Snoderly, son of George Snoderly, who also grew up in Union County. He attended Hill's Academy and is pictured with the 1910-1911 school picture on p. 99 of Union County Schoolday Memories. Harvey G. Loy was principal that year. Hill's Academy on Lost Creek in Union County was operated by Powell Valley Seminary at Wells Springs. The seminary was a branch of Grant College of Athens, Tennessee. Ferrin Hill gave the land for the Academy. In 1935, the boarding cost at this school was $6. Gladys and Lee had two children: Mary Lee, who married Edward Coleman, and Doctor Robert Mack Snoderly, who married Rebecca Buchanan. Mack is a national champion fiddle player and can be heard at the Fall Homecoming at the Museum of Appalachia. Gladys died September 8, 2011, but while she was well enough to do so, I spoke by phone with Gladys and her cousin, Alba Lee Snoderly Scott, many times. I still keep in touch with Mack and Rebecca each year during the festival. Mack and Rebecca now live at Asheville, but spent considerable time with Gladys during her last and fragile years.

This family is one of those Norris Lake Removal Families that gathered for a Reunion each year at Sweetwater until Carl Bledsoe, the organizer, passed away a few years back. Earl and Ross Snodderly, known at the reunions as the Snodderly Boys played for us. There always seems to be entertainers present to play for us. Ross, who played fiddle, and Earl, who played guitar, are sons of Gaines Snodderly They all were excellent musicians. Since many of the Snodderlys and Snoderlys are first cousins, I asked about the spelling, but Earl didn’t know why and I do not know why the difference between the Snoderlys and Snodderleys; however, I expect if one goes back far enough the two lines would mesh. Earl said his great grandfather and Henry Snodderly, Jr. (Of the Snodderly Murders) were brothers.

Picture caption: Gladys Stooksbury Snoderly and her Jenny - 1918

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