history

Who Was Abraham Lincoln?

In the spirit of “Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?” a hit game show that challenges adults to answer grade-school questions, I find myself wondering if the average adult remembers important lessons learned about the historical figures who helped shape our great nation. Recently, I was pondering Abraham Lincoln. Hopefully, we all remember that Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president, delivered the Gettysburg Address, and signed, by Executive Order, the Emancipation Proclamation. Today, however, my thoughts flow beyond historical events and more toward who he was as a person.

Davis Sisters Celebrate Milestone Birthdays

Front row left is Goldie, to her right is Lorene photographed with all their brothers and families. Sitting next to Lorene is niece Beulah who owned Pete the cat

Deep rooted in the Black Fox community in Union County, Tennessee, sisters Lorene and Goldie Davis share a rich love for the county and an unwavering love of family instilled in them by their parents.

Enriched History and Warm Welcomes at Union County Museum

Martha Atkins Carter and Wanda Cox Byerley dig deep into historical research

Reflect on Union County’s unique history with a visit to the Union County Museum and Genealogical Library, where you will feel right at home when greeted with a, “Welcome, how may I help you today, and who do I have the pleasure of meeting.” Museum volunteer Wanda Byerley says that many promptly return a smile and a family name that they wish to learn more about.

Historical Tribute Show - Union County Opry

Union County Opry

It begins on the night of Saturday, April 20, 2019 in the Union County High School Auditorium when the announcer introduces the Union County Opry Band to play a musical tribute to entertainers that have come from Union County including Lois Johnson, Carl Smith, Chet Atkins, Roy Acuff and Jim Wyrick. “The good Lord above has poured out a special bucket of talent on Union County,” said Danny Cooke.

The Hubbs-Kellys and the Shocking Tragedy of 1904

The Luttrell community was shocked to learn that on Saturday morning, April 16, 1904, Lyde Hubbs and his son, Parlin Hubbs, were killed in a tragic collision of the hack, in which they were riding, and passenger train, No. 6. The train tracks were owned by a company called KCG & LRR, and train No. 6 was due to arrive in Knoxville at 9:10 am. Just as the hack reached the tracks the train slammed into the team of horses and both horses were killed instantly having been carried a considerable distance down the tracks.