Stiner theaters brought Hollywood to our hills

Clifford Stiner's Movie Theather in Maynardville Tennessee.

Clifford Stiner's Movie Theather in Maynardville Tennessee.

There’s a little old white building located on Main Street across from Maynardville Elementary School which is the remnant of a time gone by. It was once a theater in the 1940s and early 1950s. The theater on Main Street was built and run by Clifford Stiner.

Mr. Stiner also operated theaters in Luttrell on Delmar Dyer’s property, in New Loyston (Big Ridge Area) on Cana Stooksbury’s property, and a theater in Caryville. His brother E.J. Stiner owned a theater in Sneedville. The Stiner brothers jointly owned the drive-in theater in New Tazewell.

It was at the end of the Great Depression (1929-1939): Norris Lake had been created by TVA in 1936; World War II began in 1939 and ended in 1945. The mid-to-late 1940s was a time of transition from war to peacetime.

The theater in Maynardville opened in 1945 and closed in the early 1950s. The other theaters in Union County and in Caryville were operating in about the same time period. The theater in Luttrell on Delmar Dyer’s property was down by the railroad tracks near the water company on Luttrell’s Main Street.

Jimmy Stiner and Terry Miller were both instrumental in providing information about how Clifford’s and E. J.’s movie business operated. Jimmy is E. J. Stiner’s son and both Jimmy and Terry are Clifford Stiner’s nephews.

Clifford and E. J. rented their films from a salesman who represented studios located in California—studios like MGM. They rented the movies for around $15 - $25 a movie for a rental period of about two days. Office space in Clifford Stiner’s building across the street from the courthouse was used to warehouse the movie films and was used as a movie drop off/pickup location for order fulfillment. The movies were shown at the Main Street theater in Maynardville on Tuesday and Friday nights, in Luttrell on Saturday nights, Caryville on Sundays and New Loyston on Thursdays.

All of Clifford’s small theaters had a similar setup. The box office was out front and as you entered the theater there were a few steps that led up to the projection room. Inside the main theater the floor sloped down toward the movie screen and each row had a wooden bench for a seat.

It had a seating capacity of about 40 people. The price of a movie ticket was .25 for adults and nine cents for children 10 and under. The theaters didn’t have a concession stand but people could bring their own snacks. The movies were in black and white.

Serial clips would play for about 5 minutes or so. A serial film is a series of short film clips played at the beginning of movies that were used to entice people to come back to the theater to see the sequel film clip on the next movie. I suppose it was like a cliffhanger commonly used in episodic TV programs today.

A cartoon would then be shown and then the featured movie. The featured movie was usually a Western, Western Musical or World War II movie. Movies like “Cavalier of the West,” “Hopalong Cassidy,” “The Angel and the Bad Man” starring John Wayne, as well as some Gene Autry movies. Of course, there was no air conditioning, so it would get quite warm.

Terry and Jimmy both recall helping their uncle run the projector when they were kids. Terry was about 10 years old and Jimmy a few years younger. The projector room was upstairs in the attic because it had to be higher than the audience. They used a 16mm projector to show the reel to reel films.

Terry chuckled as he recalled climbing into the dark attic to set up the film to show the movie. He had to crawl around in the dark to make sure the film projector was lined up with the four little holes that the light from projector went through to project the film onto the screen.

He said, “It was kind of scary up there! There were mice and rats running around everywhere up there.” Jimmy described the process of showing the movie in detail. The film reels were about 12 inches in diameter. The movie would usually come on three or four reels but the projector only held two reels at a time.

They would set up the first two reels to play in succession and when the film started running out on the second reel they would load the next reel in the movie on the other projector. Then they would look for a little asterisk in the bottom right corner of the screen and that’s how they would know to start playing the next reel. If you were viewing the movie, you might see a little flash or flicker as they switched between reels but wouldn’t notice much.

Clifford would facilitate elementary school groups to watch a movie at the Maynardville theater just across the street. My aunt Bonnie Peters remembers being in a group that watched a movie there during her elementary school days. My aunt June Russell said she remembered going to the theater with her older sister.

During the summer months Clifford would show movies outdoors on the side of an old hotel building that was located where the County Clerk’s Office sits now. People would sit across the street in the parking lot of the courthouse and watch the movie.

He also received clearance from the Federal Government to show movies to workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During the war everything going on at Oak Ridge was top secret. I’ve been told that even workers had a limited knowledge of what they were working on. Workers were restricted from leaving the area, so the government arranged for entertainment to be brought to them.

Marvin Elkins sent me a couple of nice photos of the New Loyston theater that was located on Cana Stooksbury’s property next to his general store, which was on Hwy 61 close to Hickory Valley Road. Neither the theater nor the general store in the photograph are still standing. A side note, this is the Stooksbury and Hutchison families who owned property and had a general store in the original town of Loyston who relocated to New Loyston when Norris Lake was formed.

Marvin’s mother, Myrtle Stooksbury who is 93, thinks her father and Clifford Stiner built the theater building together on the Stooksbury property. People would buy their snacks at the Stooksbury general store next door and bring with them to the movie.

Wanda Byerley remembers the New Loyston theater, although she never attended, she recalls the theater being there and knowing people who did go to the fights held in front of or near the theater. Neither Jimmy or Terry remembered anything about the fights and doubts Clifford had anything to do with them. I do remember my own grandfather speak of going to fights in New Loyston but don’t recall him giving any details.

Clifford Stiner had other entertainment venues unrelated to the theaters but still noteworthy. Aunt June remembers the airstrip that Clifford owned near Hwy. 61 and Old Hwy. 33 intersection near Airport Road. It was a small airstrip and with a difficult landing. He would host air shows with small aircraft that turned flips and performed stunts while she sold refreshments at the concession stand. She mentioned he even gave plane rides for people who wanted to fly.

E. J. Stiner opened the theater in Sneedville in Hancock County in the early 1950s around the same time Clifford’s theaters in Union County closed. E. J. was the sole owner of this theater and drove 50 miles from his home in Maynardville to Hancock County every day to show movies.

They showed movies up there every weeknight, three times on Saturday and twice on Sundays. Jimmy commented, “The theater was popular because people up there didn’t have anything else to do.”

Jimmy helped in the Sneedville and Maynardville theaters the most. They used a 35mm film projector to show movies in this theater. Jimmy speculated the new technology and need to upgrade equipment could be one of the reasons Clifford closed his theaters in Union County. The 35mm projector created a brighter picture for the viewer.

Jimmy explained the difference in technology in detail. He said instead of using bulbs to project the light through the two holes onto the movie screen, it had two rods pointed at each other that generated a light, something like you would see when someone is welding. There were mirrors positioned behind the rods that would reflect the light off the mirror and project the image through the two holes onto the screen. The 35mm film came on about the same number of reels as the 16mm film, so it still required someone to setup/load the reels in the correct order. By the early 1950s the movies were in color instead of black and white.

The Stiner brothers’ drive-in theater in New Tazewell was located at 125 Old Kentucky Road close to the Frosty Freeze in New Tazewell. It opened in 1951 and E. J. and Clifford sold the theater in 1974. The new owners kept the drive in open for a few more years but it closed sometime in the late 70s.

The price of admission to the drive-in was 50 cents for adults, 25 cents for children 12 and under to age 4. Children 3 and under were free.

The drive-in had a concession stand. Some concession items and prices Jimmy remembered were popcorn for 10 cents a box; hot dogs were 20 cents, candy was 5 cents a bar; and ice cream was a nickel a scoop.

The movie lot was laid out where the row in the back of the lot would park more cars and the rows became narrower as you got closer to the screen. Each parking space had a post with a speaker on each side. The speaker had a long cord that you would pick up and stretch to pull inside the car. You could roll your window up if it was cold and the speaker had a volume control that could be adjusted by the viewer.

Jimmy and Terry Miller both commented that “Thunder Road” was the most profitable and best movie ever shown at the drive-in. E. J. and Clifford Stiner were able to negotiate to rent the movie for seven days instead of the usual two-day rental.

They showed the movie for seven consecutive nights. It was sold out for all seven nights; they packed as many cars in the lot as possible at each showing.

Judson Palmer contributed that Clifford Stiner had a banner made to advertise the movie “Thunder Road.” He drove around town in Tazewell and neighboring counties to advertise the movie. The banner now resides in the Union County Historical Society.

The theater on Main Street in Maynardville is the only one of the theaters still standing. There’s still a lot of rich history that resides in the building today. Mainly the printing press in the basement of the theater along with the letters to set type. The printing press was used to print things like election cards, election brochures, business cards, etc. It was a tedious process to set the type. Each letter was placed into a square peg using a stick like tool to tighten the letters together so they would not fall out.

The cards or print stock were manually fed into the press one at a time. The machine had rollers and would roll the card/stock paper through and press the print onto the paper. Then another blank could be fed into the press and so on.

An order of 200 cards would require the same process 200 times. The printing press was also used to print a newspaper Clifford Stiner published named the “Echo.” The Echo was about 6 or 8 inches tall and 4 or 5 inches wide and consisted of 2 to 4 pages, according to Jimmy Stiner. Hopefully, this piece of history will be preserved for future generations to observe and appreciate.

Many thanks to Terry Miller, Jimmy Stiner, Judson Palmer, Wanda Byerly, Marilyn Toppins, Marvin Elkins, Myrtle Stooksbury, June Russell, and Bonnie Peters for their contributions that made it possible to chronicle this piece of history.

Clifford Stiner at the door of the theater on Main Street Maynardville in the 1940s or 1950s.

The admission price board for the theater in Maynardville in the 1940s and 1950s.

The theater in New Loyston next to the Stooksbury general store. The little girl out front is Margie Hutchison. The billboard on the front of the theater is advertising the featured film title, “Cavalier of the West.”

Marvin Elkins shared comment written on the back of the pictures. “The theater was operated by Clifford Stiner in the 40s and 50s”

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There are many interesting people living in Union County. Some of them are senior citizens with fascinating tales to tell from their lives. I also discovered a couple of impressive people who are seniors at our Union County High School. I’ve known musicians most of my (long) life. Very seldom have I met one who also writes music. Landyn Hobbins has been doing this for years. He is a emotional writer who believes that music is something that everyone can relate to, and that music connects people - especially during emotional highs and lows.

Study Says Use of Chiropractic Care Is Associated With Significantly Lower Risk of Filling an Opioid Prescription

The burden of spinal pain can be aggravated by the hazards of opioid analgesics, which are still widely prescribed for spinal pain despite evidence-based clinical guidelines that identify non-pharmacological therapies as the preferred first-line approach. Previous studies have found that chiropractic care is associated with decreased use of opioids, but have not focused on older Medicare beneficiaries, a vulnerable population with high rates of co-morbidity and polypharmacy.

Somebody's Knocking

As we say around here: “w\What runs in your family?” For some it’s music and others it may be sports. For my family, it’s strange stories.
My Mamaw Jo used to cringe as she told this story. One day she and Mamaw Girdle/Myrtle were busy cleaning house when they heard the old clock upstairs chime. Both of them were startled. It wasn’t because they didn’t realize the time. It was because the clock was broken and hadn’t worked for years. Mamaw Jo thought it was pretty, so she hadn’t thrown it away. Immediately Mamaw Girdle/Myrtle said: “Something is going to happen.” Shortly after that, ...

Events

Union County Board of Education

The Union County Board of Education will meet in regular session on Thursday, June 13, 2024 at Union County High School. The workshop will begin at 6:00 p.m. with the meeting immediately to follow.

The special called meeting of the Union County Board of Education that was scheduled for Wednesday, May 15 has been cancelled.

Spring Tour With Museum Mike!

"Come by the Lenoir Museum at 1:00pm on Saturday's throughout the spring for a tour with Museum Mike! These tours will occur on a weekly basis. These tours are completely free, but please consider registering and donating to the Museum! 100% of your donation stays in our Lenoir Museum and is used for programs, interpretive displays, and other improvements. Thank you for your ongoing support!

Lost Creek Reunion is June 9

Lost Creek Church

Anyone with ancestors who attended Lost Creek Church or have ancestors buried in Lost Creek Cemetery may want to mark June 9, 2024, on the calendar. Fred Gibson and members of the Union County Cemetery Association will hold a reunion at the new Union County Forestry Building at the entrance to Chuck Swan Wildlife Management Area.

Womens back country camping

Womens back county camping at Norris Dam State Park.

Join Ranger Holly Frerichs for an overnight experience in the back country! This is a beginner friendly workshop for women where we will learn best practices for overnight camping and some survival tactics. The hike to the campsite is 3.5 miles in and the same route back out. It is a moderate trail but very beginner friendly. This workshop is open to women and girls 15 and older.

The Norris Lake Project’s March 23, 2024, Lake Cleanup

By Renee Lowder & LeahNe' Thiele
Are you looking for a way to help your community and environment? Have you thought about volunteering every spring and fall to assist The Norris Lake Project (NLP) with Lake Cleanups?

It only takes a few hours, and it is very rewarding. You can learn more about The Norris Lake Project and the Lake Cleanups at www.norrislakeproject.com On Saturday, March 23, 2024, The Norris Lake Project had teams at four locations:

Freedom Concert Saturday May 18th at 7:00

Southern Gospel, UCHS Band, Oak Ridge Boys tribute, patriotic music, Memorial Day

There will be a very special performance on May 18th, when the Union County High School Band will be sharing the stage with the Poet Voices, a professional Southern Gospel quartet. The Freedom Concert will include patriotic music to commemorate Memorial Day and to honor Americans, as well as Southern Gospel songs, and a tribute to the Oak Ridge Boys. Tickets are $20 at the Kitchen Design Center, at the Union County Opry May 4th performance of Con Hunley, at the Union County Farmer's Market on May 4th, 11th or 18th - or or at the door.

Free admission for all Active Duty Military and Veterans

The Lions Club would like to invite all Active Duty Military and US Veterans as our guest to the Freedom Concert on May 18th at 7:00. Each Veteran may receive up to 2 free tickets from Veteran Service Officer Kevin Manley. VSO Manley may be contacted at 865-661-7243 or emailed at Kevin.Manley@UnionCountyTN. gov.

Lions Club Reverse Raffle

Tickets are $10 each. All the money raised goes directly to the Lion Charities. Tickets can be purchased from Union County Lions members Kathy Chesney (865) 566-3289, Ronnie Mincey (865) 278-6430, Debbie Sylvia-Gardner (865) 603-5081 or Shirlee Grabko (865) 310-6874.

Walk4Water Union County May 19

Walk4Water Union County is seeking corporate sponsors and walkers to raise money for Ugandan wells that provide drinking water to villages where no clean water exists. Be a sponsor or just join the walk in Wilson Park on May 19. Register at w4ki.org/w4wunioncounty. Like us on Facebook:Walk 4 Water Union County.
Questions? Call Desiree Hensley, Chairperson, 657 203 4170.

Obituary

Paris C. McBee

Paris C. McBee-age 89 of Corryton joined his heavenly father on the morning of Sunday, May 26, 2024. As a pillar of both his family and his community, he will be greatly missed and remembered. He was a loving husband to Helen J. McBee, a devoted father to Mike and Margaret McBee and his late son Jeff McBee along with his wife Diane. He was a member of Mountain View Church of God.

Joyce Marie Keck

Joyce Marie Keck – age 78 of Corryton passed away on Friday, May 24, 2024 surrounded by her family. She was a member of Clear Branch Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her husband, Dewey (Merl) Keck; parents, U.L. and Dorothy Tharp; sister, Shirley Seymore.

She is survived by her daughters, Robin Carringer, Doris (Greg) Selvidge; granddaughters, Ashley (Andrew) White, Tiffany (Ben) Grooms; great-grandson, Brayden Chaney; great-granddaughter, Noah Jean Grooms; bonus granddaughters, Ava White, Alaina White; sister, Martha (David) Evans.

Betty Sue (Murr) Ottinger

Betty Sue (Murr) Ottinger – age 81 of Lexington NC, passed away Tuesday, May 21, 2024 at Novant Health Thomasville Medical Center. She was a member of Cotton Grove United Methodist Church.

She is preceded in death by husband, Gerald Kyle Ottinger; parents, Elmer Earl Murr and Magelene Jane (Anderson) Murr; and sister, Geneva Bessie “Ginger” (Murr) Ailor. Betty is survived by children, Dennis Ottinger of Knoxville, TN and Janet (Herman) Staats of Cedar Grove, NC; sisters, Connie Frazer of Knoxville, TN and Carolyn Murr of Powell, TN; and grandson, Nathan (Hannah) Ottinger.

Lavonda Lillyann Hundley

Lavonda Lillyann Hundley – age 86 of Powder Springs Tennessee, passed away at home to join her Heavenly Father on Thursday, May 23rd, 2024. She is a member of Luttrell Baptist Church. She was a blessing to many and her greatest love was being surrounded by family. She is preceded in death by her loving husband, Earl E. Hundley; step-daughter, Linda Branum; mother, Gladys Russell; step-father, Noah Russell; brothers, Charles Hurst, Robert Hurst; sister, Mary Sampson; son-in-law, Bill Wolfe.

Robert Allen Fletcher, Sr.

Robert Fletcher, Sr.-age 68, born May 24, 1955, of Luttrell went to be with our Heavenly Father, Thursday, May 16, 2024. He is preceded in death by his father and mother, William Fletcher, Sr. and Frieda Fletcher; brothers, William Fletcher, Jr., Floyd Fletcher, James Fletcher.

He is survived by his sons, Robert Fletcher, Michael Sweat; daughter, Stella Jenkins; sisters, Phyllis Ford, Susie Bozeman; brothers, Josh Fletcher, Teddy Fletcher and several grandchildren and great grandchildren. Robert will be sadly missed.

Robert Jerry Atkins

Robert Jerry Atkins - age 74 of Washburn, passed away on Saturday May 18th, 2024 at his home. He was born on November 17, 1949. He was a member of Johnson’s Chapel Freewill Baptist Church. He retired from the University of Tennessee as a Heavy Equipment Operator. He farmed most of his life and enjoyed raising cattle. He was great with horses and enjoyed showing and racing horses in many events. He also enjoyed camping, hunting and fishing.

Jackie D. Murray, Jr.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved family member, Jackie D. Murray Jr. (Jay) – age 50 of Sharps Chapel, passed away peacefully on Thursday May 16, 2024 at North Knoxville Medical Center. He was born in Germany on January 31, 1974 to Jackie and Beverly Murray. He worked in the entertainment business for 33 years displaying a wonderful life of fun for everyone around him. Jay truly lived life to the fullest through simple pleasure chatting with friends and family, playing guitar and singing with his dad to chatting with anyone around him.

Hassie Marie Weaver

Hassie Marie Weaver – age 69 of Knoxville, passed away suddenly Wednesday, May 15th 2024. She attended Union Baptist Church, Halls, and was a graduate of Halls High School Class of 1972. She is preceded in death by her parents, Sarah Jessie Mae (Walker) Weaver and Henry Archie Weaver.

She is survived by Jackie Kiser; son, Justin Henry Weaver; daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Weaver; granddaughters, Haley and Kaley Chesney; sisters, Marylou Wilkerson, Mildred Shipley; brother, Claude Weaver; brother-in-law, Larry Shipley; sister-in-law, Gail Weaver; many nieces, nephews and cousins.

McGhlome Loyd

McGhlome Loyd – age 90 of Andersonville, passed away Thursday, May 16, 2024 at his home. He was a member of Hines Creek Baptist Church, a U. S. Army Veteran and a member of Andersonville Masonic Lodge #383.

Roger Lee Sheets

Roger Lee Sheets, age 83 of Westland, Michigan passed away on Monday, May 13, 2024. He had been in declining health for several months. Born July 16, 1940 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Roger was the son of True and Genevieve (Mathias) Sheets.

He married Jo Ellen (Hunter) on February 14, 1965 and they had three children together. They divorced in June of 1983.

Roger married Louise C. (Chapman) in January of 1984. Through this marriage, he gained three stepsons.

Jack Henry Dyer, Jr.

Jack Henry Dyer, Jr. – age 63 of Luttrell passed away peacefully Tuesday, May 14, 2024, surrounded by his family at Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center. He was a member of Luttrell Church of God. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack Henry Dyer, Sr. and Pauline Joyce (Winstead) Dyer.

Peggy Sue (Woods) Ensley

Peggy Sue (Woods) Ensley – age 82 of Maynardville, a beautiful, vivacious and loving woman was suddenly taken from us by a hemorrhagic stroke. She was born and raised in Sharps Chapel and was a graduate of Horace Maynard High School, Class of 1960. Peggy was a member of Maynardville Church of Christ and a retired employee of DeRoyal Industries with 37 years of service.

She is preceded in death by her son, Bryan Ensley; parents, Osco and Elsie Woods along with ten brothers and sisters.

Curtis Lynn Jones

Curtis Lynn Jones – age 62 of Maynardville, born July 20, 1961, left this world May 6th, 2024 at Willow Ridge Center in Maynardville. He was the life of the party and enjoyed listening to southern rock. Curtis loved life as an over the road trucker being able to see the whole country and loved a good camping trip with family.

He is preceded in death by his mother, Velma Cope; father, Roy Buck Jones; step-father, Herman Cope; sister, Rita (Randy) Dozier; brother, Steven Jones and Peggy Schmitt.

Mary Lashae Dyer Hernandez

Mary Lashae Dyer Hernandez-age 28 of Maynardville went to be with the Lord Sunday, May 5, 2024. Preceded in death by her mother, Amanda Lord; uncles, Robbie Lord, Christopher Dyer; grandparents, Ray and Mary Dyer.

She is survived by her dad, Lonnie Ray Dyer; daughter, Aalyah Hernandez; brother, Zach; grandparents, Bobby and Sharon Lord, Sherry Sexton; 2nd mom, Amy Evans Taylor; aunt, Teresa (Dennis) Barnard; uncle, Sap Dyer; special cousins, TJ Burnett, Coty, Jeremy, Corey and a host of cousins and friends.

Jason Paul Clark

Jason Paul Clark-age 44 of Sharps Chapel passed away Monday, May 6, 2024 at home. He loved fishing, hunting and spending time with his family and friends. Preceded in death by his father, Gary Masingo; mother, Sandra Hobock; grandparents Roy “Mose” Clark, Joyce Clark, Big Johny and Marie Masingo; uncles, Kenny and Ronald Clark, Arlos Masingo, Little Johny Masingo; aunt, Debbie Clark.

Larry Jackson

Larry Jackson-age 72 of New Tazewell passed away Saturday, May 4, 2024. He was born April 10, 1952, in Holly Hill, South Carolina. Larry loved to be in the mountains, hunting and fishing with his son, spending time with his family and hanging out with his dogs. Larry was a proud member of the Santee Indian Organization. He was a hardworking man and spent his life as an electrician, real estate agent and truck driver.

Jonathan Dorrance

Jonathan David Dorrance – 46 of Maynardville, passed away Friday, May 3, 2024 at home surrounded by his family. He was self employed as a plumber. Jonathan was a U. S. Army Veteran and loved to fish.

He is preceded in death by his brother, Jason Dorrance. Jonathan is survived by wife, Holly; parents, Donald and Gaynell Dorrance; brother, Justin (Amy) Dorrance; sister, Jennifer (Mike) Prusik; nieces and nephews, Kylie and Tyler Prusik and Grayson, Blake and Luke Dorrance; and aunt, Joy Porter.

Terry Jay Rolen

Terry Jay Rolen-age 67 of Luttrell went to be with the Lord, Wednesday, May 1, 2024. Terry was a good blacksmith who loved painting cars and collecting Zippo Lighters.

He is survived by his daughter, Shena Rouse; sons, Terry Shipley, James Rouse; sister, Kathy Hillard; brothers, Jack Rolen, James Rolen; girlfriend, Kimberly Rollins; stepchildren, Jason Bailey, Ashley Rollins, Brittney Rollins. Terry had many friends and family who loved him dearly.

Eula Estelle (Cook) Caldwell

Eula Estelle (Cook) Caldwell-age 87 of Corryton passed away Monday, April 29, 2024 at Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center. She was a member of Cedar Grove Baptist Church in Maynardville. Preceded in death by husband, Clyde Caldwell; parents, Hobert and Mossie Cook; siblings, Edgar, Oval, Carlyle and Carolyn.

Burleigh Lewis

Burleigh Shelton Lewis, age 88 of Maynardville, went home to be with the Lord on Monday, April 29, 2024 at Fort Sanders Medical Center. He retired from the US Air Force after 22 years serving in Vietnam from 1966-1967. He then worked at Harris Corporation in Palm Bay, FL for 18 years. Burleigh is a 32nd Degree Mason with Masonic Lodge #318 Harbor City Lodge in Melbourne, FL. He loved to joke and tease with everyone and couldn’t pass up a good deal at yard sales. He absolutely loved to haggle for bargains.

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